Posts Tagged ‘Fun’

Strategy Implementation by Human Resources

September 23rd, 2022

And why, exactly, HR? To begin with, unlike any other constituent of an organization, Human Resources is extensive, inter-departmental, and involved throughout the company; the nature of HR is to interact with and understand the processes of the business as a whole. Furthermore, the implementation of a business strategy intrinsically demands cooperation with the human work force, and whose domain is that? – Human Resources, of course. Lastly, the specific arsenal of skills necessary to strategy implementation is native to those people working in HR: similar tools for similar tasks, in a manner of speaking.

The notion of “strategic HR” is common enough – certainly a plethora of books, articles, Internet publications, and the like exists to spur HR professionals towards strategizing their business management. A great deal of progress has been made along this trend, but the fact of the matter is that much of this strategy development remains strictly conceptual; very little ground is being gained in terms of actual organizational change. Strategy, in order to be effective, must naturally be implemented. If a business is to change, people must drive the wheels of that change, and that is where HR’s true role comes into play.

Honing in on a successful method of strategy implementation, of course, can be a difficult and often overwhelming task. Even HR professionals at the forefront of their field can find themselves well out of their depth when it comes to actually putting the vehicle of strategy into gear. It is the goal of this article, therefore, to act as both friend and guide to anyone aiming to become more actively involved in the evolution of his company. HR can and should be a leading factor in the implementation of strategy. This article serves to outline but one method of strategy implementation, designed for the simple purpose of aiding HR professionals in transitioning to this new and very important realm of contribution and influence. Regardless of an organization’s size, function, or ambition, there are certain steps to be taken which are all but essential to the implementation process. It is hoped that this article can assist in streamlining HR activities and employee objectives in order to successfully deliver on company strategy.

How to Audit Your Business Strategy

March 21st, 2022

Nearly all the major initiatives undertaken by corporate executives today are called “strategic”. With everything having high strategic importance, it is becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish between the many priorities and imperatives that are initiated in organisations. When everything is clearly strategic, often nothing strategic is clear. When everything is designated as a high priority, there are, in reality, no priorities at all.

However, when the overall strategic direction is clearly understood by everyone in your organisation, the following benefits occur:

  • organisational capabilities will be aligned to support the achievement of your strategy
  • resources will be allocated to different business processes in priority order – according to the importance of that process and its contribution to competitive advantage
  • your company or organisation can excel in the market place or in its business/commercial sector.

The purpose of a strategy audit is to arm managers with the tools, information, and commitment to evaluate the degree of advantage and focus provided by their current strategies. An audit produces the data needed to determine whether a change in strategy is necessary and exactly what changes should be made.

Defining a Strategy Audit

A strategy audit involves assessing the actual direction of a business and comparing that course to the direction required to succeed in a changing environment. A company’s actual direction is the sum of what it does and does not do, how well the organisation is internally aligned to support the strategy, and how viable the strategy is when compared to external market, competitor and financial realities. These two categories, the internal assessment and the external or environmental assessment, make up the major elements of a strategy audit.

The outline that follows is derived from The Business Strategy Audit (see References). It’s intended to give you a clear idea of how to set about conducting a self-assessment audit in your own organisation, without the need for any additional training or external consultancy support. But note that this outline does not include the range of Questionnaires and Checklists and the detailed guidance to be found in the full, 124-page Audit.

The External Environmental Assessment

A conventional corporate mission is to provide distinct products and services to customers at a value superior to that offered by competitors. Without a strategy, valuable resources will be diluted, the work of employees will be unfocused, and distinctiveness will not be achieved. The external environment assessment provides any business with a critical external link between its competitors, customers, and the products/services it offers.

The fundamental reason for examining an organization environment in the process of clarifying strategy can be summarised thus:

  • Ensure that the company is meeting the needs evident in the environment
  • Prevent others from meeting those needs in a better way
  • Create or identify ways to meet future or emerging needs.

The success or failure of a company often depends on its ability to monitor changes in the environment and meet the needs of its customers and prospective customers.